Appian: Roman History, III, The Civil Wars, Books 1-3.26 by Appian, Horace White

By Appian, Horace White

Appian (Appianus) used to be a Greek reliable of Alexandria. He observed the Jewish uprising of 116 CE, and later turned a Roman citizen and suggest and obtained the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died in the course of the reign of Antoninus Pius who was once emperor 138–161 CE. sincere admirer of the Roman empire although blind to the associations of the sooner Roman republic, he wrote, within the easy 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', actually conquests, from the beginnings to the days of Trajan (emperor 98–117 CE). 11 have come right down to us entire, or approximately so, particularly these at the Spanish, Hannibalic, Punic, Illyrian, Syrian, and Mithridatic wars, and 5 books at the Civil Wars. they're useful files of army historical past. The Loeb Classical Library variation of Appian is in 4 volumes.

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Appian: Roman History, III, The Civil Wars, Books 1-3.26 (Loeb Classical Library #4)

Appian (Appianus) was once a Greek legitimate of Alexandria. He observed the Jewish uprising of 116 CE, and later grew to become a Roman citizen and recommend and bought the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died throughout the reign of Antoninus Pius who used to be emperor 138–161 CE. sincere admirer of the Roman empire although unaware of the associations of the sooner Roman republic, he wrote, within the uncomplicated 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', in truth conquests, from the beginnings to the days of Trajan (emperor 98–117 CE).

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C had rich the that was evident it very approached ^ ^ earnestly promoted the election of those most election tribunes inimical to Gracchus. The latter, fearing that evil would befall if he should not be re-elected for the following year, summoned his friends from the fields to attend the election, but as they were occupied with harvest he was obliged, when the day fixed for the voting drew near, to have recourse to the So he went around asking plebeians of the city. each one separately to elect him tribune for the ensuing year, on account of the danger he was When the voting took place incurring for them.

As his view seemed reasonable, they yielded to his persuasion, and the consul Tuditanus was appointed to give But when he took up judgment in these cases. the work he saw the difficulties of it, and marched against the Illyrians as a pretext for not acting as judge, and since nobody brought cases for trial From this before the triumvirs they remained idle. cause hatred and indignation arose among the people against Scipio because they saw a man, in whose favour they had often opposed the aristocracy and incurred their enmity, electing him consul twice contrary to law, now taking the side of the Italian allies against themselves.

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