Appian: Roman History, II, Books 8.2-12 (Loeb Classical by Appian, Horace White

By Appian, Horace White

Appian (Appianus) was once a Greek respectable of Alexandria. He observed the Jewish uprising of 116 CE, and later grew to become a Roman citizen and recommend and bought the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died through the reign of Antoninus Pius who used to be emperor 138–161 CE. sincere admirer of the Roman empire notwithstanding unaware of the associations of the sooner Roman republic, he wrote, within the uncomplicated 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', in reality conquests, from the beginnings to the days of Trajan (emperor 98–117 CE). 11 have come all the way down to us whole, or approximately so, particularly these at the Spanish, Hannibalic, Punic, Illyrian, Syrian, and Mithridatic wars, and 5 books at the Civil Wars. they're necessary documents of army heritage. The Loeb Classical Library variation of Appian is in 4 volumes.

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